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Energy Department Allocates Funding for Nuclear Physics Research

Funding opportunity

Energy Department Allocates Funding for Nuclear Physics Research

The Department of Energy has made available $18 million for nuclear physics research. Funding will be issued in two phases between the fiscal years 2022 and 2023.

Interested organizations will research particle accelerator technology, particularly next-generation accelerators and updates to existing facilities that help scientists learn more about nuclear physics. The department is looking for research into superconducting radio frequency technologies, high-field superconducting magnets and next-generation ion sources development.

DOE national laboratories, universities and nonprofit organizations are eligible for the funding opportunities. The department plans to issue two-year awards to both single investors or small groups and large multi-disciplinary teams, HPCwire reported.

Nuclear physics is a scientific field that studies the nuclei of atoms. Findings in this field can be used for nuclear power, medical imaging and cancer treatment and national security purposes.

Scientists also use nuclear physics to look at how stars produce different chemical elements and how those processes can be applied for electricity generation on Earth.

Timothy Hallman, associate director of science for nuclear physics at DOE, said accelerator technology supports developments in medicine and other industries. He shared that the funding opportunity will help keep the U.S. ahead in the field of nuclear physics.

Planned funding for the fiscal year 2022 will be around $9 million. The remaining funds will be distributed in fiscal 2023.

The funding opportunity is sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics, which is within the DOE’s Office of Science.

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Category: Federal Civilian

Tags: Department of Energy federal civilian funding opportunity HPCwire nuclear physics particle accelerator technology Research and Development Timothy Hallman

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